Uncategorized

When The Hoax’s On You

We don’t usually talk ethics over at Can I Take A Nap?, but I’m curious what other Nappers would do in this situation.

I have a lovely co-worker whose daughter is studying to become a nurse.  The daughter has a “friend” undergoing chemotherapy and is recycling all the opaque caps from plastic water bottles as a way to pay for her chemo.  Sad tale for sure, but the story of using plastic bottle caps to pay for chemo is a hoax.  My co-worker is gamely collecting every cap she can find, and asking us to share any we might have so she can give them to her daughter.

Which brings me to the crux of my problem:  do I tell my office pal that this is not really helping anybody?  Or do I just keep my trap shut?  Eventually she will find out the truth.  Her actions are not hurting anybody and we might inadvertently be keeping caps out of landfills. (or not)

The irony in this story is that plastic cap recycling is not addressed in most community recycling programs.  Aveda, the hair/cosmetics company has partnered with schools on a cap recycling program, but they appear to have maxed out the number of schools participating.   Some freestanding Aveda stores will take your caps, but that also seems to an ad hoc thing.  If any of you kind readers know of established programs/outlets  feel free to make a PSA here to get the word out.

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “When The Hoax’s On You

  1. What a bizarre thing, I’d tell her for sure. How could she believe such a thing? I wonder who was cruel enough to start that hoax. Even collecting cans only nets you $.05/per, how much does she think she’s going to get for those things. That’s just tragic.

    What I don’t understand is why they can’t make the caps out of recyclable forms of plastic, like the bottles themselves. That’s never made sense to me.

    1. I know, right? I see the claim that the cap is “smaller than ever to save our Earth,” but it’s still a rigid plastic. Our town allows us to include rigid cardboard food containers (like juice boxes) in our weekly recycling stream, but you have to remove the cap first. (face palm)

  2. I would sit her down and approach it from the stand-point of wanting to help protect here. I’d use lots of phrases like, My understanding is…. What I’ve read and believe to be true….. Stuff like that.

    It’s sensitive job. But I think that if you do alert her to what is going on, she will probably be more thankful to you than anything. Saving someone from looking foolish can only help them in the long run.

    I’d tell her.

    1. Thanks, Eric. I’m kinda leaning that way. If she explains to me how this whole thing is supposed to work, I’ll let you’all know, but I find the gullibility of ‘net savvy youth a bit odd. I mean, this is something you can easily check out with a few clicks, no?

  3. I, too, would tell your coworker. I would want someone to alert me to the truth. I tried to research if there were any programs out there like Aveda but didn’t find much. I did find Whole Foods mentioned but I’m not sure the information was up to date and, while they did accept #5 recycling, it was/is(?) done to help the environment and not for cash.

    1. Today I did tell my co-worker, and she called her daughter to ask for the whole scoop. Will keep you posted on the outcome, but she did thank me for telling her. If this turns out to be a legit program I’ll post it here.

    1. We do wish Kitty a speedy return to the type of gastric health an old diva as herself should expect.
      And we know the damn autocorrect has its way with us from time to time. 🙂

Feel Free To Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s